Faculty


Yossi Sheffi

Yossi Sheffi

Director, Supply Chain Management Program
Director, MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics
Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Elisha Gray II Professor of Engineering


Dr. Yossi Sheffi is a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he serves as Director of the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics (MIT CTL). He is an expert in systems optimization, risk analysis, and supply chain management, which are the subjects he teaches and researches at MIT. He is the author of many scientific publications and four books:

  • Urban Transportation Networks: Equilibrium Analysis with Mathematical Programming Methods (Prentice Hall, 1985)
  • The Resilient Enterprise: Overcoming Vulnerability for Competitive Advantage (MIT Press, 2005)
  • Logistics Clusters: Delivering Value and Driving Growth (MIT Press, 2012)
  • The Power of Resilience: How the Best Companies Manage the Unexpected (MIT Press 2015)

Under his leadership, MIT CTL launched many new educational, research, and industry/government outreach programs, leading to substantial growth. He is the founder and the Director of MIT's Master of Supply Chain Management degree. He also led the international expansion of MIT CTL by launching the Supply Chain and Logistics Excellence (SCALE) global network of academic centers of education and research. The network includes centers modeled after MIT CTL in Zaragoza, Spain; Bogota, Colombia; and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

From 2007 to 2011 he served as the Director of the MIT Engineering Systems Division, where he set a strategy, revamped the PhD program, and set the division for future growth.

Outside the university Professor Sheffi has consulted with governments and leading manufacturing, retail and transportation enterprises all over the world. He is also an active entrepreneur, having founded and co-founded five successful companies:

  • Princeton Transportation Consulting Group Inc.
  • LogiCorp Inc.
  • e-Chemicals Inc.
  • Syncra Inc.
  • Logistics.com Inc.

Dr. Sheffi was recognized in numerous ways in academic and industry forums and was on the cover of Purchasing Magazine and Transportation and Distribution Magazine. In 1997 he won the most prestigious recognition given by the Council of Logistics Management—the Distinguished Service Award. In 2006 he won the Aragón International Prize. In 2010 he became an honorary Doctor (Doctor Honoris Causa) of the University of Zaragoza in Spain and in 2011 he was awarded the Salzberg Medal and Award for "outstanding leadership and innovations in Supply Chain management" by the University of Syracuse. He is also a life fellow of Cambridge University's Clare Hall College.

He obtained his B.Sc. from the Technion in Israel in 1975, his S.M. from MIT in 1977, and Ph.D. from MIT in 1978. He now resides in Boston, Massachusetts

 

Bruce Arntzen

Bruce Arntzen

Executive Director, Supply Chain Management Program
Senior Research Director
Dr. Arntzen is the Executive Director, MIT Supply Chain Management Program where he oversees the SCM curriculum, student admissions, faculty selection, and student job placement. He serves as the faculty advisor, oversees Master’s theses, and teaches the course “Global Supply Chain Management.” As a Research Director he leads the MIT Hi-Viz Supply Chain project which is developing automated board-ready visualizations of the supply chain and its critical risk pathways. Dr. Arntzen founded two supply chain consulting firms, lead industrial engineering and operations planning groups at Digital Equipment Corp., performed operations management consulting at Arthur D. Little, Inc., and served as an economic analyst at The World Bank in Washington, DC. An expert on Supply Chain Risk Management and International Supply Chain Operations, he is a frequent speaker at industry conferences including CSCMP, WERC, APICS, OIA, and INFORMS. He has thrice served as the President of the New England Chapter of CSCMP. Dr. Arntzen holds a BA and BS from Bucknell University, an MSE from Johns Hopkins, and a PhD from MIT.

Alexis H. Bateman

Alexis H. Bateman

Director, Responsible Supply Chain Lab
Research Associate
Alexis Bateman is a Research Associate and Director of the Responsible Supply Chain Lab at the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics. She has over ten years of experience in sustainability in the public sector, industry, and academic settings. Her work focuses on deep tier supply chain social and environmental challenges and strategy implementation through both theoretical development and applied industrial practices. Through her research, she has been able to engage closely with industrial partners, public agencies, and non-governmental organizations like Greenpeace.

Dr. Bateman is the lead researcher and co-author on a book examining sustainable supply chains with insight from over 150 companies and hundreds of practitioners forthcoming with MIT Press. She founded and directs the MIT Responsible Supply Chain lab that organizes and builds on almost a decade of sustainable supply chain management research at MIT CTL. The lab has ongoing research projects including but not limited to: palm oil traceability, seafood risk, apparel supply chain transparency, and cross-commodity traceability analysis. Prior to joining MIT, Alexis worked with the City of Santa Ana, the Orange County Transportation Authority, and the Los Angeles River Revitalization Plan as a part of Tetra Tech. She received her Ph.D. from the School of Social Ecology at the University of California, Irvine in Environmental Planning and Management and Masters in Urban and Regional Planning. 

Jonathan Byrnes

Jonathan Byrnes

Senior Lecturer, MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics
Jonathan L.S. Byrnes is Senior Lecturer at MIT, where he has taught at the graduate level and in executive programs for over fifteen years. The courses he has taught, Case Studies in Logistics and Supply Chain Management and Integrated Account Management, together cover all strategic and operational aspects of customer-supplier relationships.

He has authored over one hundred books, articles, cases, notes, and expert submissions. He wrote a monthly column on managing profitability, called “The Bottom Line,” in Harvard Business School’s Working Knowledge e-newsletter (hbswk.hbs.edu) for four years (2002-2006). Dr. Byrnes has supervised thesis work in ABB, C&S Wholesale Grocers, Cardinal Healthcare, Cisco, Dell, Flextronics, Honeywell, iRobot, Lahey Clinic, Nebraska Medical Center, Northrop Grumman, Philips, Procter & Gamble, Raytheon, and United Technologies.

Dr. Byrnes earned a DBA from Harvard University in 1980, and an MBA (Smith Prize for academic distinction and leadership) from Columbia University in 1974. He is Immediate Past President of the Harvard Alumni Association, and he served for two years as Vice President of the Harvard Club of Boston. He also served for five years on the Board of Directors of the Harvard Business School Alumni Association, and for two years on Harvard’s Committee on Shareholder Responsibility.

He is President of Jonathan Byrnes & Co., a focused consulting company that he founded in 1976. He has advised over fifty major companies and industry associations. Dr. Byrnes has served on the Advisory Boards of Objectiva Software and Autopart International, two companies that were acquired at a substantial gain, and he currently serves on the Advisory Boards of danoo, OCO, and WaveMark, all early-stage companies.

Chris Caplice

Chris Caplice

Executive Director, MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics
Silver Family Research Fellow
Sr. Lecturer
Dr. Caplice is the Executive Director for the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics. In this role, he is responsible for the planning and management of the research, education, and corporate outreach for the Center. Prior to this, he served as the Executive Director of the SCM Program. He is also the founder of the MIT FreightLab - a research initiative that focuses on the way freight transportation is designed, procured, and managed. His primary research is in all aspects of freight transportation to include combinatorial procurement auctions, robust planning, portfolio management, performance metrics, and infrastructure design.

Prior to joining MIT, Dr. Caplice held senior management positions in supply chain consulting, product development, and professional services at several companies including Logistics.com and SABRE. He is also the Chief Scientist for Chainalytics, a leading analytical supply chain consulting firm. In this role, he pioneered and leads the Chainalytics Model-Based Benchmarking Consortium (MBBC).

Dr. Caplice received a Ph.D. from MIT in 1996 in Transportation and Logistics Systems. His dissertation on Optimization Based Bidding for transportation was selected as the winner of the Council of Logistics Management (CLM) Doctoral Dissertation Award and received an Honorable Mention in the 1996 Dissertation Award sponsored by the Transportation Science Section of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS).

Caplice was recently named the Silver Family Research Fellow at MIT in 2016.

Dr. Caplice also served five years in the Army Corps of Engineers, achieving the rank of Captain. His writing has appeared in the Journal of Business Logistics, the International Journal of Logistics Management, and Transportation Research. He obtained a Master of Science in Civil Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin and a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from the Virginia Military Institute (VMI).

 

Chris Cassa

Lecturer, MIT Supply Chain Management Program
Instructor, Harvard Medical School
Research Affiliate, Boston Children's Hospital
Associate Geneticist, Brigham and Women's Hospital
Research Affiliate, Broad Institute

 

Jane Dunphy

Director of English Language Studies 
Senior Lecturer of English Language Studies
Jane Dunphy directs MIT's English Language Studies Program and teaches a variety of subjects in professional and cross-cultural communication (e.g., Communication for Managers, Scientific and Technical Writing, Advanced Speaking and Critical Listening, and Communicating across Cultures).

Charles Fine

 


Charles Fine

Chrysler Leaders for Manufacturing Professor of Management Science, Sloan School of Management

Charles Fine focuses on technology supply chains. He examines how to assess the present—and especially the future—profitability and strategic leverage among the various sectors in the supply chain; how to design the supply chain (i.e., determine the boundaries and identity of the organization) based on strategic and logistical assessments; and how to assemble the capability to realize the chosen organizational boundaries and manage within and across those boundaries. He is author of Clockspeed: Winning Industry Control in the Age of Temporary Advantage.

Jarrod Goentzel

Jarrod Goentzel

Director, MIT Humanitarian Response Lab
Research Associate

Jarrod Goentzel is founder and director of the MIT Humanitarian Response Lab, which strives to make supply chains more responsive to human needs. His research focuses on supply chain, transportation, information management and decision support systems. Based in the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics, Dr. Goentzel has developed graduate-level courses in supply chain finance, international operations and humanitarian logistics and has extensive experience using simulation games to develop intuition and leadership skills. He also directs the MIT Renewable Energy Delivery project.

Previously, Dr. Goentzel was Executive Director of the MIT Supply Chain Management Program, where he was responsible for design and management of the nine-month professional master’s degree program. He joined MIT in 2003 to establish the MIT-Zaragoza International Logistics Program, which developed novel education, research, and outreach programs with the Zaragoza Logistics Center in Spain. Dr. Goentzel has also led supply chain consulting and product development teams with a large ERP company and technology startups.

Dr. Goentzel received a Ph.D. from the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, a M.S. in applied mathematics from Colorado State University, and a B.A. in mathematics from Tabor College with studies at the Technical University of Budapest (Hungary).

Steven Graves

Steven Graves

Abraham J. Siegel Professor of Management, MIT Sloan School of Management Professor of Engineering Systems

Dr. Graves received his Ph.D. in Operations Research from the University of Rochester. He is interested in the development and application of operations research models and methods to solve problems in manufacturing systems, supply chains, and service operations. Current projects include strategic inventory positioning in a supply chain and optimizing the design and configuration of an order fulfillment center.

Dr. Graves was the Chair of the Faculty at MIT from 2001 – 2003. He has also served as Deputy Dean of MIT Sloan School of Management and Co-director of the MIT Leaders for Manufacturing program (now called Leaders for Global Operations). He is a faculty affiliate of the MIT Operations Research Center.

Dr. Graves has consulted extensively to industry and served in editorial capacities on several professional and academic journals.

 

Leigh Hafrey

Senior Lecturer, Leadership and Ethics

Larry Lapide

Larry Lapide

Research Affiliate

Dr. Lapide has over 30 years of experience in industry, consulting, business research, and academia. Most recently he was the Director of Demand Management at the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics (CTL). He also managed the launch of MIT’s Supply Chain 2020 Project and is responsible for the Strategy Alignment Workshop, one of three interactive executive education workshops created by the Center.  

In 2001, Dr. Lapide was recognized by Supply Chain Technology News magazine as one of four top thought leaders in supply chain; and in 2006, he was featured in Supply Chain Management Review’s “Profiles in Leadership” column. DCVelocity magazine named him as a 2007 Logistics Rainmaker.  Prior to CTL, Dr. Lapide worked at AMR Research serving variously as VP and Service Director for Supply Chain Strategies, VP of Research Operations for Business Applications, and GM for Benchmarking Services.  

Previous to AMR, he was an associate partner with Accenture and also worked at Data General, Arthur D. Little, and Benchmarking Partners. He currently teaches part-time at the University of Massachusetts’ Boston Campus.  He holds a Ph.D. in operations research from the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, a master's in electrical engineering from MIT, and a bachelor's in electrical engineering from The Cooper Union.

Christopher Mejía Argueta

Christopher Mejía Argueta

Director, MIT Supply Chain and Global Logistics Excellence (SCALE) Network for Latin America
Director, MIT Graduate Certificate in Logistics & Supply Chain Management (GCLOG)

Christopher Mejía Argueta is a Research Scientist at the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics. He develops applied research on retailing operations and food supply chains for consumer packaged goods manufacturers and retailers. His work focuses on improving the efficiency of operations activities in multiple stakeholders, understanding the evolution of retailers and its impact on high-performance logistics, commercial strategies, and reducing undesired socioeconomic problems (malnutrition, income disparity, inaccessibility) by proposing sustainable policies, business models to help low-income areas.

Dr. Chris Mejía is also the Director of the MIT Supply Chain and Global Logistics Excellence (SCALE) Network for Latin America. This initiative, conducted by the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics in the region, aims to lead impactful research and education projects for all companies, public sector and society together with Latin American top universities and the support of the Center for Latin-American Logistics Innovation (CLI). In addition, Dr. Chris Mejía serves as the Director of the MIT Graduate Certificate in Logistics & Supply Chain Management (GCLOG), an elite program from the MIT SCALE Network, geared towards outstanding graduate students from Latin America.

He holds a M.Sc. in Industrial Engineering with focus on supply chain management and optimization, and a PhD in Industrial Engineering with focus on Humanitarian Operations. Dr. Mejía got both degrees with honors at Monterrey Tech, Mexico. In 2013, Dr. Mejía was the academic leader at CLI, where he developed dozens of projects with industry and other academic partners related to disaster response, green logistics, packaging and last-mile distribution in emerging markets. Prior to joining MIT CTL, Dr. Mejía Argueta was a Postdoctoral Researcher at Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands, where he investigated retailing operations for emerging markets and co-edited a book about nanostores.

Eva Ponce

Eva Ponce

Executive Director, MITx MicroMasters in Supply Chain Management
Research Associate

Eva Ponce is the Executive Director of the Supply Chain Management  MITx MicroMasters Program and a Research Associate at the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics. She oversees the five online MITx courses in Supply Chain Management (CTL.SCx courses) that make up the MicroMasters Program. The courses are attended by tens of thousands of students in open enrollment. Her current research focus is the design of urban distribution models (freight deliveries) with special focus on omni-channel distribution. She also leads research initiatives on Reverse Logistics and Closed-Loop Supply Chains.

Dr. Ponce has over fifteen years of experience in teaching and research in supply chain management and quantitative models for industrial engineering. In 2008, she received her tenure as an Associate Professor in Supply Chain Management and Logistics at the School of Industrial Engineering of the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM).

Dr. Ponce received her PhD in Industrial Engineering from Carlos III University of Madrid in 2002. Her dissertation received two awards with special distinction. In 2000, she was granted with a pre-doctoral research stay in the Hass School of Business, University of California, and in 2011, she was a visiting professor at MIT CTL. She has an active publication record, including journal papers, conference proceedings and refereed abstracts.

James B. Rice, Jr.

 


James B. Rice, Jr.


Deputy Director, MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics
Director, Integrated Supply Chain Management Program
Director, Supply Chain Exchange Program


Jim Rice joined the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics (MIT CTL) in 1995 and he was appointed as the Deputy Director of the Center in 2007.  In this capacity he oversees several research and outreach programs, MIT CTL Executive Education Programs and outreach marketing activities.  Jim serves as the Director of the MIT Integrated Supply Chain Management (ISCM) Program, a collaborative research consortium with industry sponsors. As part of these roles, Jim works with industry sponsors to develop research projects and educational and knowledge sharing events for the sponsors.

In addition to his core responsibilities at MIT CTL, Jim also serves in several other capacities:

  • Researcher in Supply Chain Management - Jim conducts research in supply chain management, with particular focus on organizational aspects of how firms coordinate both internally within the organization, and externally with customers and suppliers.
  • Instructor in Supply Chain Management - Jim is instructor for the graduate course "Supply Chain Context" in MIT's Master of Engineering in Logistics academic program.
  • In addition to his role at MIT, Jim has been invovled with several organizations:
  • Co-founder of Daily Grommet, early-stage COO and currently investor
  • Member of Scientific Committee, International Center for Competitiveness Studies in the Aviation Industry (ICCSAI), Bergamo, Italy, 2007-Present
  • Appointment as Visiting Faculty Member, Politecnico di Milano MBA School (MIP), 2006-Present
  • Member of National Research Council's 'Board on Manfacturing and Engineering Design' (BMAED) serving through 2005
  • International Advisory Board for the KLICT Research Initiative sponsored by a Ministry of the government of The Netherlands
  • Editorial Board for Supply Chain Management Review
  • The Editorial Board – Supply Chain Forum: An International Journal, 2001 – Present

Background

Prior to joining MIT, Jim managed manufacturing and distribution operations at Procter & Gamble, and served as a sales and market manager at General Electric Company. Jim earned his MBA in Operations and Finance from the Harvard Business School, and a Bachelors Degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Notre Dame located in the undulating hills of northern Indiana.

Donald Rosenfield

Donald Rosenfield

Senior Lecturer, Sloan School of Management
Director, Leaders for Manufacturing Fellows Program

Dr. Rosenfield holds a Ph.D. in Operations Research from Stanford University. He is co-author of Operations Strategy, Competing in the 21st Century and Modern Logistics Management, and has written articles for a number of journals, including Harvard Business Review, Operations Research, Management Science, and Sloan Management Review.

Dr. Rosenfield’s research focuses primarily in manufacturing strategy and supply chain management. Some specific areas of interest include the development of facility and supply chain strategies in a global environment and how location and sourcing decisions are made.

Dr. Rosenfield has served at M.I.T. since 1980 as Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, and Visiting Associate Professor. He has also served on the faculties of Harvard Business School, the State University of New York, and Boston University. At MIT he has developed courses in Manufacturing Strategy, Operations Management, and International Logistics. Prior to joining MIT, Dr. Rosenfield served on the staff of Arthur D. Little, Inc. from 1976-1988 focusing on logistics and manufacturing strategy.

Omar Sherif Elwakil

 


Omar Sherif Elwakil

Postdoctoral Associate

Omar Sherif Elwakil is a Postdoctoral Associate and Digital Fellow at the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics. He holds a Ph.D. in Supply Chain Management with a minor in Operations Management from the Robert H. Smith School of Business, the University of Maryland, College Park. Prior to joining MIT, he was Lecturer at the University of Maryland, Visiting Lecturer at Northeastern University, Research Assistant at the Harvard Business School, and DHL Supply Chain Regional Program Manager.

Dr. Elwakil’s primary research interests are multinational direct investment strategy and the political environment, and global supply chain and transportation flows in the presence of external barriers and disruptions.  His Ph.D. dissertation research involved the institutional environment for foreign direct investment, with an emphasis on the effects of political risk and political uncertainty on multinational firms’ decisions.  Dr. Elwakil’s research has been published in the Journal of Business Logistics, Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, and the Journal of Air Transport Management. His paper titled "Transborder Demand Leakage and the U.S. - Canadian Air Passenger Market" was featured by a number of media outlets, including The Economist andReuters, and was utilized by the Canadian Competition Bureau in the review of the Air Canada and United Continental Holdings, Inc. joint venture agreement.  Dr. Elwakil was also invited to present the paper to the Office of the U.S. Secretary of Transportation to support economic policy development.

Dr. Elwakil is a winner of the Top 15% Award for Outstanding Teaching at the University of Maryland and the Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER) Summer Research Grant. He is a member of INFORMS, POMS, CSCMP, DSI and the Academy of Management.

David Simchi-Levi

 


David Simchi-Levi

Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Co-Director, Leaders for Global Operations Program

Research Interests:

  • Transportation and logistics systems analysis
  • E-Commerce and supply chain management
  • Revenue and yield management
  • Optimization based decision support systems
  • Operations research
  • Telecommunications systems
Pamela Siska

Pamela Siska

Lecturer, Writing, Rhetoric and Professional Communication

Pamela Siska has been with MIT's Writing and Communication Center since 1993. She is also a lecturer in Writing, Rhetoric and Professional Communication and was a contributor to The Mayfield Handbook of Technical & Scientific Writing. Pamela holds an MA in English from Boston University, where she taught writing and literature courses before coming to MIT. She has published articles on medieval, Victorian, and Romantic literature and is currently writing her D. Litt. thesis on Percy Bysshe Shelley. She is also a freelance editor.

Josué C. Velázquez-Martínez

 


Josué C. Velázquez-Martínez

Executive Director, Masters of Supply Chain Management – Blended Program
Director, MIT Sustainable Logistics Initiative

Josué C. Velázquez Martínez is a Research Scientist at the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics specialized in Logistics and Supply Chain Management in manufacturing, food, and retail industries, and has vast experience in conducting applied research on Sustainable Logistics in emerging markets. Dr. Velázquez Martínez leads two research streamlines: the MIT Sustainable Logistics Initiative, which involves research projects on green logistics sponsored by multinational companies, with the purpose of improving fuel consumption and CO2 emissions in logistics operations, and the MIT Micro Supply Chain Management Lab, which aims to improve the efficiency of small firms, and involves on-site research at approximately 200 small enterprises across Latin America in collaboration with the region’s top universities. Dr. Velázquez Martínez also serves as the Executive Director of the MIT Supply Chain Management blended program, an elite program that allows learners to combine the MITx MicroMasters credential with one+ semester at MIT. As a part of his teaching activities, Dr. Velázquez Martínez is a frequent lecturer in the Executive Education courses at the center, and he is also the lead instructor of the graduate course SCM.290 Sustainable Supply Chain Management at MIT.

Dr. Velázquez Martínez holds a MSc in Manufacturing Systems with focus on Optimization and a PhD in Industrial Engineering with focus on Sustainability in Supply Chains from Monterrey Tech, Mexico, where he was approved with honors from both programs. He also received the Doctoral Dissertation Award issued by the Mexican Logistics and Supply Chain Association as recognition for the best doctoral thesis. In 2013, Dr. Velázquez Martínez was a Postdoctoral Researcher at Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands, and he also was part of the first class in the STVP – Faculty Fellows Program at Stanford University. Prior to joining MIT, in 2014, Dr. Velázquez Martínez was the Dean of the Engineering School at Monterrey Tech in Santa Fe.

Matthias Winkenbach

Matthias Winkenbach

Research Associate

Dr. Winkenbach is a Research Associate at the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics. His current research focuses on multi-tier distribution network design in the context of urban logistics and last-mile delivery. Dr. Winkenbach received his Ph.D. in Logistics and his Masters in Business with specializations in Finance and Economics at WHU – Otto Beisheim School of Management in Germany. He also studied at NYU Stern School of Business in New York as well as at the École des Hautes Études Commerciales (HEC) in Montréal, Canada. His doctoral studies focused on the optimal design of multi-tier urban delivery networks with mixed fleets. His work was closely linked to a research project with the French national postal operator La Poste. During and after his doctoral studies, he spent several months at the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Winkenbach’s previous professional work includes working with Volkswagen in South Africa on local sourcing and cost optimization, with Deutsche Telekom in Germany on co-investment models for network infrastructure expansions, with McKinsey & Company in the United States, and in Germany on organizational redesign in the automotive industry and on innovative delivery models in the postal and express logistics sector, as well as various other projects in the mining, shipbuilding, consulting and logistics industries.